You are here

Clinical Research Trials at the Sinai Cancer Care Center

PDF of current clinical trials

Mount Sinai Hospital is proud to offer state-of-the-art cancer treatment through our oncology clinical trials program. We are an affiliate member of the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of the Northwestern University Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Program.  Mount Sinai Hospital is dedicated to providing novel treatment technologies to our patients and the communities we serve. Our trained clinical research staff consistently set us apart with a comprehensive list of active clinical trials over a broad therapeutic area.

Below are some frequently asked questions regarding our clinical research program. If you are interested in participating in any of our studies, or would like additional information, please contact our Research Coordinator at 773-257-6110.  For a list of Active Protocols, please click here.

What is a clinical Trial?

A clinical trial is a research study to answer specific questions about vaccines or new therapies or new ways of using known treatments. Clinical trials (also called medical research and research studies) are used to determine whether new drugs or treatments are both safe and effective. Carefully conducted clinical trials are the fastest and safest way to find treatments that work.

What are clinical trial phases?

Clinical trials of experimental drugs proceed through four phases. The government has strict guidelines and safeguards to protect people who choose to participate in clinical trials. Every clinical trial in the U.S. must be approved and monitored by an Institutional Review Board (IRB) to make sure the risks are as low as possible and are worth any potential benefits.

What protections are there for people who participate in clinical trials?

The government has strict guidelines and safeguards to protect people who choose to participate in clinical trials. Every clinical trial in the U.S. must be approved and monitored by an Institutional Review Board (IRB) to make sure the risks are as low as possible and are worth any potential benefits.

What is informed consent?

Informed consent is the process of learning the key facts about a clinical trial before participants decide whether or not to participate. These facts include:

  1. Why the research is being done;
  2. What the researchers want to accomplish;
  3. What will be done during the trial and for how long;
  4. What risks are involved in the trial;
  5. What benefits can be expected from the trial;
  6. What other treatments are available;
  7. The fact that patients have the right to leave the trial at any time.