John Marshall Law School’s Student Bar Association Raises Over $5,000 for Sinai Children’s Hospital at Charity Event

Release date

Tuesday, February 11th 2014

CHICAGO, IL — At an event held at John Marshall Law School on February 6, 2014, members of the John Marshall Law School’s Student Bar Association raised over $5,000 for Sinai Children’s Hospital. The charity event, “Karnival for Kids,” was held as a benefit for Friends of Sinai Children, a nondenominational, volunteer organization dedicated to developing resources and opportunities that enhance the quality of life of children touched by Sinai Children’s Hospital.

Funds were raised through ticket and raffle sales and a silent auction with prizes like a package of White Sox tickets, a full Bar review course from Kaplan, and tickets to a Second City show with John Marshall professor, Hugh Mundy. Guests also enjoyed a caricaturist, a face painter and other carnival favorites. “Karnival for Kids” was sponsored by: • Chicken Planet, • Taco Pato • ChilL Products • Athena Greek Restaurant • Pan Hellenic Pastry Shop • Cafecito • Brando’s Speakeasy • Kaplan Bar Review • Barbri • Pogofsky Real Estate Group

About the Friends of Sinai Children

Established in 2004, Friends of Sinai Children is an associate board of young professionals dedicated to developing resources and opportunities that enhance the quality of life of children touched by Sinai Children's Hospital. Sinai Children's Hospital, the only children's hospital on Chicago's West Side, provides health care to underserved children who are at greatest risk for chronic health problems, physical and emotional abuse and neglect. As part of the Sinai Health System, Mount Sinai's Emergency Room is only one of four Level 1 adult and pediatric trauma centers in the city of Chicago. Sinai Children's Hospital also has a 35 bed neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to treat the smallest and sickest babies, some no more than 1 lb. when born. In addition, Sinai receives transfers from other hospitals that are not able to treat critical pediatric patients.